Optimised Campaigns Leveraging Brand Search – Guide to Recruitment SEO part 4

My last post looked at optimising a key area of your recruitment website content – your vacancies.

Vacancy optimisation is designed to capture traffic for long tail search like “landscape gardener job in Rickmansworth”, and that long tail can mean a 30% uplift on your site traffic. But there’s another search behaviour in recruitment. Brand search.

It sounds obvious when you say it out loud. Job seekers are looking to work at specific companies. Would you like to work at Google? Maybe Mencap? Perhaps Microsoft? There are already recruitment agencies cashing in on this search. Let’s try some searches:

1) Jobs at Google. Position 3 belongs to Womenintechnology.co.uk

2) Jobs at Microsoft. Position 2 belongs to Womenintechnology.co.uk

3) Jobs at Mencap. Position 3 belongs to Jobs.guardian.co.uk

Here’s the Mencap page:

Jobs at Mencap - Optimised campaign page

Note the meta code is dynamic and includes the employer name in the <title> tag, though the description could be handled a little better:

<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" />
<meta name="keywords" content="MENCAP, Guardian Jobs, job search" />
<meta name="description" content="2 jobs with MENCAP to view and apply for now with Guardian Jobs" />
<title>
Jobs with MENCAP | Guardian Jobs | Job Search</title>

By creating a set of pages optimised for your key clients, you can leverage extra search traffic from job seekers using brand terms as a starting point. You’d think that job seekers would go directly to that specific company to apply. Not always so. Perhaps the website design isn’t clear enough to know what to do (jobs websites are way better at converting cv’s right?). Perhaps the job seeker doesn’t want to approach the company directly, for confidentiality reasons. Either way, this method does generate traffic, and there are already agencies and cleverly seo’d jobs boards out there that are capitalising on the traffic.

Comments

  1. Gab Goldenberg

    Might want to nofollow the Google links – no use sending PR to pages that are blocked in robots.txt, and besides which won’t build you a better relationship with G.

  2. Pingback: Optimising vacancy pages for SEO - guide to recruitment SEO part 3